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in for a second term on the martin luther king jr. holiday leaning on the words of king and lincoln. >> through blood drawn by lash and sword, we learn no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half slave and half free. >> casting himself in the mold of the great civil rights leader, vowed action on a series of issues from climate change to immigration reform and became the first president to use the word "gay" in the address. >> our gurn noi are not complete until wives, daughters, can earn a wage equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brother and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> he offered a bigger defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit, but we reject the belief america has to choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started it with a prayer service at st. johns church before departing the white hous
possible. without douglass, there is no obama. >> without lincoln, there is no obama. so it's not only a matter, is it, of faith in history, it's a matter of faith in people who have the imagination and the audacity to make history. >> absolutely. and certainly frederick douglass understood his role in terms of acting as an advocate during lincoln's administration. he was obviously putting some pressure on the white house. at the same time, he was issuing a call to arms to his own community to rise up because he understood that history ultimately comes from below. it isn't -- you know, is it part of he's enveloping lincoln in a movement. there's a movement that surrounds lincoln and the other abolitionists to move all of this forward and make it a reality. >> there weren't 10,000 people with you there at the tomb, but the poem suggests someone else had been there and left this newspaper? >> there were other pele who had come before me and had left various objects. i don't know who they were. someone had left a newspaper. perhaps aware, perhaps not that douglass himself had been a journ
. >> when lincoln was debatings baiting about the future of the country, lincoln studied the deck la ragsz of independence. lincoln with his thinking about america on the declaration of ind pen accidence. not yes on the constitution, but more fundamentally on the declaration. it's obviously what the civil war was about. this was lincolnesque in the sense that he was applying -- barack obama was applying the thinking about the unity of the country in the dignity of all men and women to the problems he faced today in saying there's a role for the union, if you will. don't forget, lincoln talked about the union, there's a role for the union, there's a role for all of us, together, to solve the problems that we all face. and that was the lincoln part of it. this came, and there's a big conflicting. we the people believe that ea enduring security do not require through perpetual war. who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. and we must carry these lessons into this time as well. i think he's talking about iran. the one war that you face within the next few moblts. . >> you may very
king jr., and another bible, the one belonging to president lincoln. and then later on, as the parade was about to begin, the first family, a modern scene here. dad on his blackberry, the girls snapping pictures on their iphones. all day long, abc's david muir has been following this, he was there at the capitol watching history on parade this morning. we begin you with, david. >> reporter: diane, good evening. you're right. we were just a few steps away from the president, with his hand placed on those two bibles. authorities here in washington were estimating 600,000 to 800,000 people would turn out to the national mall to watch this swearing in. but tonight, we just learned from the inaugural committee, just like four years ago, that crowd might have surpassed a million. at the white house, a salute to the president, who was about to be sworn in before the nation. first, that 1.7-mile trip to the capitol. ahead of the president, on the west front of the capitol, a former president and the secretary of state. cheers on the national mall for the clintons, mrs. clinton looking better
the robinson family bible. on monday for the public inauguration, he will use the lincoln bible and martin luther king, jr.'s, traveling bible. >> stephen: that's a freaky bible three-way! and it's so transparent that old hollywood hussein over here, used lincoln's bible only to ride the popularity of spielberg's blockbuster. the same reason back in '92 clinton hopped on the "basic instinct" wagon by swearing in on sharon stone's vagina. [ laughter ] an oath he kept, by the way. [ laughter ] don't get me wrong they put on a good show with our money. you've got beyonce, kelly clarkson, james taylor. and i have to admit, this shows how far we've come as a nation. a black guy who likes james taylor? ♪ because i've seen fire and i've seen rain ♪ ♪ but i've never seen a black guy at your show ♪ [ laughter ] then came the presidential pride parade, with eight floats from obama and biden's home states hawaii, illinois, pennsylvania, and delaware which honored delaware by just driving through the parade on its way to somewhere else. [ laughter ] and of course, this being democrats, there h
address in history is the second inaugural address which is lincoln which some people say surpasses the gettysburg address. it's the best lay sermon no history. >> and dr. jill bide ep is accompanied by honey alexander, the wife of senator lamar alexander. and by debby boehner, wife of house speaker john boehner. sorry to interrupt you there. >> more recently, you may disagree with the content and the tone but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now bu
of texas. he can rise above everyday politics and speak to history. lincoln did in the 1865, f.d.r. in 1937, now it's obama's chance." did he do that? >> yeah, i think he did it pretty well. this wasn't lincoln 1865 but we haven't had one since. the closest was roosevelt 1937. we're not likely to see that, charlie. i thought he did whatrand said he should do. i appreciate what mark is saying but i think this is not a programmatic speech. this is not a speech where you talk about here's my four-point jobs program. it's a speech about vision and i thought he gave a good sense of where he wanted the country to be i think it clearly was a progressive democratic speech. in f you read reagan's in 1985 it was a conservative republican speech. and a as for those who say -- i watched fox news who say he didn't offer olive branches or reach across the table to try to encourage birtisanship, i would note 16 years ago bill clinton in his second inaugural said that you have sent a democratic president and a republican congress back to washington, you didn't send us back to engage in bickering and partis
. and they are measured against their predecessors. abraham lincoln remains a huge inspiration for president obama. wayne is a washington analyst and former diplomat who examined years for what it takes for a president to become unforgettable. what could barack obama's legacy be? what will he be remembered for? >> i think his historic place is secure. however that does not mean his legacy is secure. his legacy is probably what he thinks his second term is all about. >> not far from the lincoln memorial, a tribute to america's many war dead. president obama is pledge to bring home the troops from afghanistan and to completely rethink defense strategy. >> the obama administration will put a huge focus in the term on reducing spending. one of the things he will look at is the cost of the transatlantic security relationship. >> a strategic rethink could have consequences for europe. president obama could push ahead with an idea floated up by the previous administration. >> donald rumsfeld wanted to eliminate american presence in europe. that will be on the agenda again. >> china clth town in washington, d.c.
lincoln y martin luther king. >>> el presidente hablÓ de temas impulsados por lincoln y king. >>> su gente es que tiene que conseguir la libertad en la tierra, declarÓ obama cuya investidura no fue tan multitudinaria, pero sÍ emotiva. >>> tenemos mucho trabajo que hacer por delante, tenemos que hacerlo todos juntos. >>> instÓ a la unidad entre partidos para resolver asuntos como el dÉficit, proteger a los niÑos de la violencia y armas de fuego, que todo ciudadano tenga una oportunidad y eso incluye a los inmigrantes. >>> nuestro recorrido no estarÁ completo hasta encontrar una manera mejor de recibir a los inmigrantes esforzados que ven a estados unidos como el paÍs de las oportunidades. obama quisiera que la reforma migratoria sea un elemento positivo de su legado. >>> claro que la reforma de inmigraciÓn va a ser parte del legado de este presidente incluso con la reorganizaciÓn de la economÍa y el fin de diez aÑos de guerra. >>> la presencia latina se hizo sentir como nunca antes. la primera magistrada sonia sotomayor presidio el juramento de joe biden que pidiÓ que fuera ella
) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and working together. the first place poster altogether for all of us to see. i would like to name everybody. community youth center of san francisco, the young asian women against violence youth participant jennifer chang. kimberly how. erica lam. allie lee. adriana wen (sounds like) diana -- and amy ung. congratulations everybody. (applause) (applause) (applause) good job everybody. thank you. and so at this time supervisor -- or do i give it back to -- nancy. thank you again. >> at this time we would like to call supervisor carmen chu. (applause) >> i think that is part of the program they wanted the winners to perhaps say a few words. >> thank you for choosing our picture. we were really surprised when you did. we are really happy. (applause) >> we were very surprised. thank you very much.
abraham lincolns and one martin luther king jr.'s or the 21 gun salute or the trumpets blowing fanfare, inaugurations tell us something deeper about ourselves and the president we have chosen to lead us. >> we have always understood that when times change, so must we. >> change. this time around that word means something else to barack obama. he used his second inauguration to make an saw dags claim that the coalition that elected him is the next america, the rising generation and he spoke directly to and for them. it was a new american progressivism unleashed. >> for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. >> and you could see in the vast crowd this was a moment won after fierce id logical combat and hard political work. before the speech we spent some time among the
, beautiful buildings, the lincoln memorial, actually passed the lincoln memorial onto the franklin delano roosevelt memorial. something struck me there, quote from fdr: the test about progress is not whether we add more to those who have enough but whether we provided enough to those who do not have enough. we want to make sure that people see real differences. i look forward to working with all of you colleagues for years to come. i am excited about what comes forward this next year; i am excited about the changes that we have with new blood here on the board of supervisors. it makes things interesting. thank you very much for your time. (applause) >> i want to thank all of you for the incredible honor of serving as your president for the next two years; other forward to continuing to work with each and every one of you is great to see you faces, supervisors yee and breed. there are so many cool that we need to thank; it takes a village to support the work that we are doing and i want to take a few moments to thank special people in my life. first of course, i have to thank th
said he really drew inspiration from dr. king and abraham lincoln for today's speech, ed. >> that's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about a
20 years, it probably isn't. it may happen by chance. when lincoln creates a really interesting words, one of the words he first uses he's talking about secession. he said the secessionist sugarcoating the impact on this country. the printer of the united states comes to lincoln and says we cannot put this in the official record. lincoln said i can't imagine any american not knowing. again, going back to william safire's influence on his, one of the first uses of cool, not in the sensor temperature, but the sense of being callous coming he said that was cool. i was a behavioral thing. so again, obama could come up with a new meaning of cool. one word and you give. how i did this quiz i did a lot of reading and i did a lot of use of huge proprietary databases at the library on price. nineteenth century databases for you can find the original document in which 1807, when jefferson raised to danbury baptists and comes up with this race and the separation of church and state, which is not in the dictation. first articulated in this letter to danbury baptists preach everything. a lot of it
and the -- in the atrocity of abortion and it should be as important as, you know, slavery was back in lincoln's time. it's the right of everyone to have life and liberty and these unborn babies across the country are being killed and we have a pro-life charity, saveunbornlives.org and we're trying to call to attention to look at these innocent little ones and offer hope to a abortion-mined women to choose life. i hope you get someone to speak on this issue because over 50% are pro life americans now and that should be the number one topic we should be talking about a personhood amendment just like lincoln talked about freing the slaves in his amendment. host: we'll be talking about the ageneral ka for the second term coming up in our last half of "the washington journal" this morning and we'll talk about, could there be another contraception fight like there was during the first term but you mentioned roe v. wade. that's the front page of the "washington times" this morning, abortion battle rages 40 years of row decision. protest planned in washington. more than one million abortions are performed each
lincoln y otra sobre la de martin luther king. la multitud fue menor del millÓn ochocientos mil que acudiÓ a su primera toma. >>> nuestro viaje no es completo hasta que encontremos una mejor forma de darle la bienvenida a los inmigrantes. defendiÓ a los gay para que se los trate con igualdado, dijo que terminarÁ el trabajo incompleto de los primeros 4 aÑos. >>> debemos actuar sabiendo que nuestro trabajo serÁ imperfecto, minutos antes fue juramementado el vicepresidente joe biden, el poeta blanco hablÓ de la experiencia de ser hijos de cual cubanos. >>> manos tan cortadas como la de mi padre cortando caÑa de azÚcar superque . >>> el presidente obama comenzÓ con un servicio religioso brindado por un pastor latino. >>> de alguna manera yo me siento que soy un representante para el pueblo hispano aquÍ en estados unidos. >>> Él apreciÓ la inclusion del tema migratoria. >>> habÍa que estar aqui para sentir como que hay esperanza. que vamos a tener un mejor maÑana. >>> este dÍa es mÁs importante que hace 4 aÑos, porque estamos cerca a ganar el camino a la ciudadanÍa para los lat
-- probably the most important advance since lincoln signed the emancipation proclamation. during that year if johnson was. mr. inside and some outside because he gave some inspirational speeches, king kept the pressure on. whenever he thought that the congress was going to falter, that they couldn't beat a southern filibuster, king went to jail. and he refused to let people forget what this was all about. i'd like to concentrate on one particular period because we have a anniversary coming up today, and i think looking at johnson and king during the struggle over the voting rights act in 1965 illustrates as well as anything the brilliance of both these men, the difficulty of their task, and their multidimensional leadership. the most important aspect -- one of the most important aspects of which was the uncanny ability of both johnson and king to seize opportunity. they knew whenle to strike. -- when to strike. on january 15, 1965, president johnson called martin luther king to congratulate him on his 36th birthday. let as -- let's listen to a little bit of what they had to say. well, we'l
and continue to move ahead with courage really influenced her. then she went on to a school called lincoln school that produced a lot of socially active leaders in our nation. missionaries came and educated children to become more socially minded, to think about the world they lived in. that began the early activism inherent piqued her interest in why am i here and what is my purpose? from that point down she was purpose-driven in by the time she got to antioch she became involved in the naacp the progressive political party in the peace movement. she was involved in the police movement well in advance of daddy speaking out on the war in vietnam. >> host: this public image of your mother is behind-the-scenes, quiet. >> she was a quiet storm. [laughter] >> host: what was she like as a person? >> guest: she was very issue driven. she had a gentle spirit and the thing that i like to say about her the most is she exuded the unconditional love of god like nobody ever knew. i didn't know my father's will because i was only five when he was assassinated. she satel mail the time i don't hold grudg
and linco lincoln. >> he urged action on the deficit and global warming and keeping kids safe. >> we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing the generation that will build the future. >> we can, he said, find a way. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and we will see that so long as we seize it together. >> many who came were moved. >> hopefully it will be a kicking off of a great second term and a new direction for the country. >> it's great, seeing all the fellowship. >> so much to see and hear. beyonce's national anthem ♪ gave proof through the night >> the inaugural parade was a pageant. colorful floats and talented bands. and leading the way were the obama's who walked part of the way to the white house. for a second term. >> a senior republican said here, by his remarks, president obama, at least in republican hoped, had opened the door to more cooperation. live from washington. now back to you. >> steve, you covered many inaugurations before, what stood out to you about this one? >> the obama
with his hand on two bibles. one used by lincoln at his first inauguration and one used by dr. martin luther king, jr. >> preserve, protect and defend, the constitution of the united states. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> john roberts administered the holt and president obama and daughters stood by his side. >> for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do well and a growing number barely make it. >> the weather was chilly but michelle obama and president obama took time to walk some of the parade walk. >> and the ball is underway right now in washington, d.c. a live look at president obama and michelle obama having this dance. the festivities under way in the nation's capital. let's take a listen. [ music playing ] >> al green toon there. >> there are only two balls this year. the president and the first lady enjoying the dance. >> tens of thousands of people filled the national mall today to get a look at the inauguration ceremony. ktvu's ken pritchett is live in the nation's capital where he spoke with people who were thrilled to be a
and abraham lincoln. >> he spoke about eclusion, cooperation, and hope. >> as he was leaving the capitol steps, the president paused to take in the spec spectacle. he said i'll never see this again. >> in case you're wondering the 3 words that he uttered, gay, making history today by mentioning gays. as we went on throughout washington d.c., we had an opportunity to meet with a class that came here from oakland, 46 students who had -- many of them who had never been out of oakland in their lives getting the opportunity to witness history in -- when obama was sworn in today. >> for any eighth grader, it's the opportunity of a lifetime. a trip to washington d.c. to see the president imagurated. >> kind of like a wright of passage. >> at this school, it was practically unheard of. 8 out of 10 students come from low income house holds. this 8th grade teacher said he students live on some of the roughest streets. she said it would be a game changer for the students. >> it would cost 1,$760 per student. she and the students would -- $1,760 per student. that looked like an incredible number that was
in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out and it has a picture of me. now when i wrote this book, i envisioned that i would be reading to children just like you, and the reason i thought of that is because my grandmother and my aunt lived in the home with us and many times they would baby-sit for my mother and father and they would sit and read to us and engage us in conversation. so i thought that this book would be like a grand conversation. i'm going to read some things to you. and so often children and even adults don't think about dr. king as a normal boy who did the same things that you do. you like to play, right? and so did he. all right. now i'm going to read some of the things to you. i start out by saying, gather around and listen, just like you are gathered around me, as i share childhood memories of my brother, the reverend dr. martin luther king jr. i am his older sister and i have known him longer than anyone else around. i knew him long before the speeches he gave and the marches he led and the prizes he won. i even knew him before he dreamed the d
, as it was by lincoln and by roosevelt? a lot of people don't remember that and don't know it. england, i was in england talking to their lawyers. i was talking to their security people. they don't have a constitution. they have much different ability to hold people for longer periods of time, and what they would do under similar circumstances. it is an issue we are thinking about and an issue the american bar association will have to respond to. >> a very different sector of the set of problems you have been wrestling with, are the problems faced by our justice system rooted in deep problems in legal education, especially aspiring -- spiral in student debt, forcing lawyers away from public interest -- especially spiraling stood in debt, forcing lawyers away from public interest? >> i have a son who graduated from university. i have a niece who graduated last year and another niece is considering going to law school. i have been looking at the economics of going to law school. they are out of kilter. the profession is not to
. oath of office. by placing owned by dr.king as well as one belonging to president abraham lincoln. >> as we head in the overnight hours we are seeing increasing clouds. patchy frost mainly in the north bay. it will burn off with plenty of sunshine in. if you're going to like today, you are going to like tomorrow. temperatures mainly in the 40's indicated by the dark blue. we can see if overnight the purple is showing 30's. once again, a cool morning and it is going to be a nice day. 50s and 60s. taking a look at it tomorrow morning. 28 degrees in santa rosa. 40's in oakland. waking to 40's in the san jose. for the afternoon highs 66 degrees and mid-60s for the east bay shore. and also low 60s there as well 60s in the san rafeal. and 60s for downtown san francisco. the satellite and radar showing some cloud coverage with this system that will drop down to the gulf of alaska with showers your kron 4 7 day around the bay pushing towards tuesday and wednesday with another round of showers for the weekend. >> take a look of this dog. if you don't believe what the power a bath and a hai
would not be here if it were not for president abraham lincoln who demonstrated outstanding leadership. put his own political career on the line; by signing the emancipation proclamation. 120 years ago. leadership - does not belong to one gender. does not belong to one class. does not belong to one race. leadership -- lives and breathes inside all of us. whether you're a member of the clergy, labor, and advocate, nonprofit organization, staff, we are all leaders and we have a social responsibility to each other. to live together peacefully, to ensure that in a democratic society that we are living and honoring our democratic principles. to be fair to all persons. all ethnicities, all sexual orientations, and religions. an african-american, a woman. don't lose sight of the purpose of the conversation today. today jane and i want to make a statement that oftentimes foreshadowed when you don't have the pulpit. today we successfully have demonstrated that even the sidelines, even the corner, you can raise your voice, have another opportunity, another option, viable, strong, that has i
% of their kids registering. 74 turned up. that was great. lincoln and galileo and lowell was part of this program. i want to thank the students for this. i want to reach out to the families and the k-12 and universities. san francisco state we were able to register 3,000 students. and we had the highest number of provisional ballots. we had 600 on that campus. and so this upcoming year we have a few things on the agenda. the department of director is up for review. that is starting in may, and we are starting work on that already. the director is interested in improving accessibility issues. s -- we have requirements of the machines old. and we have received complaints of voters not able to access the cards or not seeing the ballots. so we will work on that this coming year. and is the other issue is the issue of privacy around voter information. one of the big of the challenges that the department has is to be sure that people get the information they need to vote. many voters prefer this information to be kept private. we have to figure out a way to either have an e-mail or phone number. it ser
was issued by president abraham lincoln, january 1, 1863. one of the most influential documents that declared all persons held as slaves within the confederate territory are here for and henceforth held free. i just want to go on record publicly acknowledging 150 years. that is quite an accomplishment. today's actually the 84th anniversary of doctor martin luther king's birth. many people know who doctor king was, a clergyman, activist, husband, father, the most prominent promoter of nonviolence and civil disobedience; he received the nobel peace prize in 1964 in recognition of his nonviolence. only we discussing assault weapons ban ammunitions but acknowledging that today would have been doctor martin luther king's 84th birthday, a very prolific activist. i would like to recognize and former city employee and decorated soldier mr. hillyer terry, born june 4, 1923. while attending college he was drafted to serve in world war ii; he served the united states army from 1943 to 1946 where he received an honorable discharge; he was awarded the american theater campaign medal; the eaim ca
and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and looked, that was astounding. 23 seconds he stood there and he gazed out at the national mall to let it sink in. it must have been an extraordinary day for him. what does today hold for him after that full night of dancing he had? >> reporter: he heads to the national cathedral. the day after inauguration, the presidents always get a chance to go sit down at an interfaith service, a prayer and prayers are given not only for the president but also the vice president for their second terms. this is historic event that d
nominees glamorize guns: "django unchained," "zero dark thirty," "argo," "lincoln" and the worst one of all "les miserables." who among us didn't want to shoot russell crowe? [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] and movies aren't the only culprit. the real problem is the media our kids consume. isn't that right, media adults consume? >> why does congress always take aim, if you will, at guns? >> you've got to talk about society, violent video games >> these are murder simulators. they rehearse the action. >> the extraordinary realism to video games and movies now, et cetera, does cause vulnerable young men, particularly, to be more violent. >> stephen: true, and in a lot of these games they're not just using guns but crowbars, baseball bats, and even chainsaws. that puts frightening ideas in kids' heads. at this point, if i see a teenager coming at me with a chainsaw, i'm sorry, but i cross to the other side of the street. [ laughter ] of course, video game violence is not a new problem. who can forget, in the wake of sim city, how children everywhere took up urban planning? [ laughter ] it w
much in the tradition of king and of lincoln and he has rallied his base. we'll be talking in the next few days about all the negatives and the negative reviews are coming in. today is the day for president obama. this is a day when he really defined what he believes fundamentally. >> david, do you think this is, someone said this is a speech he wished he could have given four years ago but wasn't able to. how did he seem to you? >> i thought it was a marvelous speech and it is brave and it is bold and i think it will play well in history. not enough people are talking about the climate change. there was a healthy paragraph in there about that. 30, 40 years ago, the fact that he took an inaugural speech and used that kind of time and talked about climate is important and just making seneca and selma and stonewall. it will be repeated over and over again as part of the traditions of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him smeng stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he
speeches and i remember both of lincolns, kennedys, fdr's. >> greta: i take it you don't remember lincolns from personal experience. >> no, but it's finer than the gettysburg address. the president's was not uplifting. it was not poetry, it was pros and part of it was pedestrian and partisan and i think he missed a golden opportunity. the whole country was watching and he should have lifted the whole country. this was part of a state of the union address and i thought the president lost an opportunity and they usually talk about what? and when i was a kid, lexington, concorde, bunker hill, stonewall, a barroom brawl in greenwich village in 1969 when the cops hassled the gays in the bar and threw them out. does that belong in a presidential inaugural? >> i thought, one thing he has been -- i mean, he speaks beautifully, inspires people. i thought he wasn't interested in his own speech. i don't think he sold it. i thought he just read it to us. i was actually quite surprised because whether you agree with him politically or not, he can just sort of. he can dazzle everybody when he speaks, bu
abraham lincoln, i saw at least three speeches in there. the nation without liberty and equality, remain half free and half slave. and that's almost word for word from the house divided. gettysburg address, we have a republic, by the people, for the people. and lincoln's famous message to congress in 1862 before the emancipation proclamation he said as we think anew as our case is new so must we think and act anew. but, look, you don't become, you know, big rhetoric by simply copying the words of somebody else, you have to have a big original thought. charles was right. this was a declaration of liberalism is back in all its glory you about he couldn't say the era of big government is over or find a memorable phrase that introduces the idea, this is about expanding government and more power. >> sean: stay right there. and according to cbs we ought to be a one party country. and we'll explain. more from washington as we keep our eye on the inauguration 2013. and will the spending hit them in the pocket? details of na plan. and world champion the shooter showed us on friday night the stupi
from the foot of the u.s. capitol to the lincoln memorial to witness history. the second inauguration of president barack obama. the 57th u.s. presidential inaugural. as he walked off the platform, the president paused, telling everyone he won't do this again, and he looked back. a reflective moment to start his second term. before the real business begins tomorrow, tonight, it is all about the celebrations. the inaugural balls. we're going to take you to erin burnett and pierce mas morgan. >> we got the good assignment here. maybe hard to hear. >> best gig in hollywood. washington, any way you like. >> that's right. there are going to be ibt 40,000 people coming to where piers and i are here tonight. this is it, this ball and the one upstairs, those are the two the president is going to be attended, and they have all of the hot acts. >> the inaugural ball is on this floor, and it's currently the biggest disco you have seen in your life. 35 people will be swilling and guzzling around here. upstairs, the commander in chief ball. a little more exclusive. you will see stovy wune stevie y
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